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The defendant, Jose Bermejo, represented by Tamara Harris, a Lawyer, was indicted in August of 2008 for raping his wife, Blanca Mizhquiri. This offense took place in the presence of his children. During the assault, Mr. Bermejo demanded sex from his wife and she refused. Mr. Bermejo then proceeded to punch, slap, bite, pull her hair, threaten her, and forcibly have sexual contact with her. Mr. Bermejo was found guilty of the offenses.

Before Mr. Bermejo was sentenced, he filed a motion with the Courts through his lawyer, Ms. Tamara Harris to set aside the guilty verdict. The Court denied the motion on July 20, 2009. On July 27, 2009 Mr. Bermejo was sentenced to 90 days in jail for Forcible Touching and one year each term on Assault and Endangering the Welfare of a child. These sentences were to be served concurrently. Mr. Bermejo asked the Court to vacate his conviction.

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This decision refers to two separate cases for criminal crack cocaine possession and criminal possession of drug paraphernalia which occurred in separate incidents, involving two separate and distinct defendants. They were charged separately and were tried separately but the appeals are here resolved jointly because of similarity of issues.

In the first case, two police officers were in the vicinity of Broadway when they saw a speeding car with its tires screeching. Pedestrians on the crosswalk jumped and ran back to the curb so as not to be hit by the speeding car. The two police officers chased the car and pulled the car over.

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Incarcerated offenders often apply to the Supreme Court to have their convictions overturned. In order for the Supreme Court to hear a case, it must be a case that involves an issue of law or of constitutional significance. If a person has been incarcerated and they believe that their case qualifies for Supreme Court review, they can submit a motion to the court to be heard.

One such case involved a defendant who was convicted of felony charges in connection with two narcotic sales that he made to undercover New York State Police Investigators. The defendant alleges that the Rensselaer County Court made a mistake in denying his motion to suppress his identification as the subject who sold the drugs. He contends that the photo array that was presented to the officers was unduly prejudicial.

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In drug cases, the City of New York is entitled to seize an impounded vehicle that has been used in a drug operation. They must, however show that the vehicle that is being seized is not co-owned by someone who is innocent of any wrongdoing. That co-owner must be given an opportunity to demonstrate that his or her ownership of a seized vehicle outweighs the City’s interest in seizing it.

In one particular case, a couple purchased a 2002 Mitsubishi Montero. They purchased the vehicle in March of 2002 and have made monthly payments of $600 drawn on a joint checking account to pay off the vehicle. In December of 2004 when the vehicle was seized, it had a fair market value of $16,000.00.

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In a domestic violence case, the victim’s information is kept confidential. In this case, a not-for-profit corporation that houses victims of domestic refused to provide the address and telephone number of one victim when asked by a court to produce such in relation to a domestic violence case the victim filed against her partner. The victim’s partner is charged with various felonies arising from domestic assault.

According to the non-profit corporation, Social Services Law prohibits the release of the actual address where the victim is being sheltered. The non-profit corporation also asserted that the information sought is also shielded by a common-law victim-counselor privilege.

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The paramount consideration with respect to a change of custody determination must be the best interests of the child. A home environment of constant fear where physical or psychological violence is the means of control and the norm for the resolution of disputes must be contrary to the best interests of a child.

A 30-year old man filed a petition in court seeking custody of his son alleging that the son’s mother is mentally ill and mentally abusive to their son. The mother asserted that she has had de facto custody of the child since birth and she has provided him with a stable home. The mother also said the father was criminally abusive.

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On June 19, 1997 two twin boys were born in the Dominican Republic. Their mother was tormented by their father. She moved to the house of her mother and filed for a protection order in the Dominican Republic. She then took steps to move her residency and her boys to the United States. She left her boys with her mother while she went to New York to establish residency. While she was gone, her ex-husband filed a custody order with the Dominican Court System claiming that she had abandoned the boys and left the country. The mother agreed to a temporary custody arrangement that would enable the boys to live with their father until she had established residency in New York.

When she returned to the Dominican Republic to visit the boys, she found out about the custody procedure that the father had initiated claiming that she had abandoned her boys. At that hearing, even though, the mother filed an appeal, the boys were given to their father with full custody.

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This case is rather difficult because the complainant her or the victim was not able to identify the two people who robbed him of his wallet. The victim did not even see the weapon that was used against him. It was his belief that what was used was a gun that his assailants pressed against his neck. It was also specially difficult because the prosecution was only relying on the testimonies of the two women accomplices of the defendants.

According to a report, the defendant was charged with robbery in the first degree along with several other charges which are robbery in the second degree, criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree, and menacing in the second degree, upon a jury verdict, and imposing sentence. Looking at the story of the crime that took place, it was a “simple” case of getting somebody’s wallet. But because of the other crimes that were committed, this “simple” case became complicated.

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A person threatens you with a knife and asks for your money. Is that person guilty of robbery or extortion? Or is it both? A study discusses a case which illustrates the difference between robbery and extortion.

On March 11, 1974, George Woods was charged with robbery in the second degree, grand larceny in the second degree, grand larceny in the third degree and burglary in the third degree. He was found guilty by the Trial Court of 2nd degree robbery. Unhappy with the criminal verdict, Woods appealed to the Court of Appeals for a review of the case.

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We all know that taking someone else’s property is a crime. We have different names for the different situations in which it might occur. Shoplifting, robbery, burglary, etc. But what if a person took property that was originally his? Would it still be a crime? A source tells of two interesting cases reviewed by the Court of Appeals that will answer this question.

The first case involves Edward Reid. He was charged with murder, 2nd degree robbery, and illegal possession of a weapon. He was found not innocent of the first and guilty of the last two. According to reports, he and his stepbrother, Andre McLean, approached three men in a street in Bronx. Both Reid and McLean were armed with pistols. Reid asked the three men to return the money they owed him for certain drug transactions. Two of the men paid up but the third man said he had no money on him. He asked Reid if they could go up to his apartment to get cash. As they walked up the stairs to the apartment, Reid took McLean’s pistol and told him to hand over the cash that he was holding for Reid. McLean handed over $300 and rushed at Reid. A shot was fired and McLean was hit in the chest. He died not soon after of the wound. Reid then ran away.

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